Category: Press

Leadership Lesson: Gandhi Was a Disruptor

The author, Rajan Chopra, is an Executive Coach, Advisor and Strategist to S&P 500 companies, entrepreneurs and investment professionals. 

Gandhi Was A Disruptor!

Yes, the Mahatma was the granddaddy, grand master of disruption on the grandest scale.

To many hundreds of millions of people, perhaps even billions, he’s known as the humble, spiritual man who defeated the British empire and secured India’s independence. Without armed revolution or war.

He did what had never been done before in the annals of history – liberated a nation from a mighty colonial empire by non-violent means. And thereby disrupted political and military doctrines forever.

To this day people all over the world still marvel at what this man accomplished with his vision, leadership, unrelenting perseverance and humility.  He has inspired millions including other great world leaders that followed such as Dr. Martin Luther King, Nelson Mandela and Barack Obama.

Upon his death, almost seventy years ago, hundreds of thousands came to the funeral where one broadcaster eloquently observed:

“…the object of this massive tribute, Mahatma Gandhi, died as he had always lived. A private man, without wealth, without property, without official title or office. He was not a commander of armies nor a ruler of vast lands. He could not boast of any scientific achievement or artistic gift. Yet men, governments, dignitaries from all over the world have joined hands and come to pay homage to this brown man in a loin cloth who led his country to freedom.  Mahatma Gandhi has become the spokesman for the conscience of all mankind. He made humility and simple truth more powerful than military empires…”

The British ruled India for 200 years.  Through a highly organized administration and military force the rulers had an effective stronghold on governing and ruling a nation of 350 million people. The Indians were exploited, divided and conquered to benefit the British empire.  It was British rule.  And the Indians wanted freedom from an oppressive foreign power. There were several national uprisings and movements to free India from the British.  And each time they were quashed by the mighty British empire.

Earlier in his life Gandhi studied law in England and later moved to South Africa where he found oppressive laws against the minority Indians resident there. He chose to fight those unjust laws and deployed a strategy of “non-violent civil disobedience” against the authorities with considerable success.  This experience led him to think big – freedom of India from the British using a similar strategy.

Gandhi understood that an armed revolution against the British would not succeed in liberating India.  Besides it would cause much bloodshed.  He also knew that the British depended heavily on exploitation of the vast Indian workforce they employed to profit from the trade-and-rule doctrine of their colonization of India.

What could the freedom seekers possibly do?

Gandhi developed a thesis:  100,000 armed British soldiers cannot control 350 million people if the ruled refused to comply with the ruler’s commands. That is, through non-violent, non-cooperation the British colonization in India would grind to a halt and the rulers will ultimately see the futility of their occupation of India.

A brilliant strategy.

Together with other like-minded Indian freedom fighters, Gandhi toiled to win the hearts and minds of the Indian people.  That was the key for execution of his strategy. Win the hearts and minds of the people and rouse them into a large collective force of civil disobedience against the British.

He understood the psyche of the Indian people. He also knew the limitations of the rulers.  He led by example. Lived humbly. Traveled extensively. Became one with the masses. Stood up to the British authorities at every instance. Organized nationwide general strikes by workers disguised as “a day of prayer and fasting” which paralyzed the nation. He provoked the British with mass marches such as the famous “salt march” to break the symbolic control of the rulers. He was jailed several times. And used each such instance to his advantage to win more hearts and minds and further antagonize the British.

He persevered for almost three decades to rouse the collective will of the people to engage in non-violent-civil-disobedience until the day finally arrived that the British finally saw the futility of their continued attempt to rule India.

India became an independent nation, and the world’s largest democracy, on August 15, 1947.

Some leadership attributes are obvious: strategy, execution, perseverance, integrity and humility.

What is not so obvious is how great leaders accept and adapt to the factual or perceived obstacle or weakness and convert it into a great tool to accomplish the outcome sought.  In this instance – the freedom of India.

Disruptive thinking at its best!

www.chopracoaching.com

 

 

 

 

 

Cantor Law Firm Moves Miami Office

 

From left to right: Arthur J. Dichter, Partner; Grace C. Lopez, COO; Sarah B. Jacobson, Associate; Steven L. Cantor, Managing Partner; Kathryn von Matthiessen, Partner; Sharon Dresser, President High Street Retail ,USA; Paul J. D’Alessandro, Jr., Associate

Cantor Law Firm Moves Miami Office

The Cantor Group law firm has moved its Miami office from the Brickell Financial District to Coconut Grove.

Formerly known as Cantor & Webb, the international tax law firm signed a 10-year lease in the Biscayne Bank Tower at 2601 S. Bayshore Dr. The firm and its 25 or so employees will occupy a full floor spanning 14,411 square feet in the 22-story Class A office tower.

“We are thrilled to be in a location so readily accessible and convenient for our clients and employees,” said CEO Steven Cantor, who specializes in international tax and estate planning for high net-worth international clients. “Coconut Grove is what all of downtown Miami should have been—parks, pedestrian walkways, jogging paths, bike lands and of course great views of Biscayne Bay.”

Escaping the congested Brickell area, where parking is difficult, was an added bonus.

The lease was valued at about $7 million, a spokesman told the Daily Business Review. Leasing rates averaged $34 per square foot for Class A buildings in Coconut Grove during the second quarter, according to CBRE Inc.

-Carla Vianna, Daily Business Review

Daily Business Review Article

 

New Cumberland Farms in Deerfield Beach sells for $5.3M

An investment group tied to High Street Retail USA has sold a convenience store it developed in Deerfield Beach. 

New Cumberland Farms in Deerfield Beach sells for $5.3M

Broward County records show Swope Properties LLC is the new owner of the 2.1-acre property at 1335 South Federal Highway. The 1031 exchange is managed by Patricia Swope of Louisville, Kentucky. Doug Aronson and Patrick Nutt of the Calkain Companies represented the buyer.A 1031 exchange paid $5.26 million for the newly built Cumberland Farms, Sharon Dresser, president of High Street Retail, told The Real Deal. Dresser and her partners paid $3.1 million for the property, formerly the site of Nielsen’s Furniture, more than a year ago.

Dresser said the partnership purchased the property in January 2015 after securing permits and the tenant, Cumberland Farms. They knocked down the existing building and turned it over to Cumberland Farms, which completed the new building in November. The seller, Federal & 13th LLC, subdivided the lots and kept 0.9 acres, which Dresser said is currently leased to a church.

Deerfield Beach has seen a flurry of new commercial and residential development. The Cumberland Farms store sits on the corner of South Federal Highway and Southeast 13th Court. “This was an overlooked corridor in Deerfield Beach,” she said in a press release. “You wouldn’t recognize the area compared to a few years ago. A lot of national tenants have opened including Chipotle, Whole Foods, Aldi and LA Fitness.”

By Katherine Kallergis

The Real Deal Article

 

Doral’s Explosive Growth Attracts Major Pharmacy

Hines hired High Street Retail to find a tenant for the corner of 87th and Doral Boulevard. High Street’s Sharon Dresser bought CVS to the table.

Doral’s Explosive Growth Attracts Major Pharmacy

MIAMI—One of the nation’s fastest-growing cities, Doral is attracting plenty of developers. CVS is the latest brand to take interest.

Hines hired High Street Retail to find a tenant for the corner of 87th and Doral Boulevard. High Street’s Sharon Dresser bought CVS to the table.

As she figured it, with so much housing coming online, CVS would be a good match for Doral Corporate Center. Developers broke ground on a 13,000-square-foot pharmacy with a drive through that will open in fall 2016.

“I’ve lived in Miami for 15 years and always take a creative and forward thinking approach,” says Dresser. “I know South Florida like the back of my hand and over time you get a sense of the development flow. My first project here was back in 2005 when I was helping to lease Doral Court. Even back then, I knew that at some point things here were going to explode.”

Explode is a good word. Downtown Doral has emerged as a hot market and Codina’s project is driving at least some of the momentum.

An 11-building office park there traded hands in October. Meanwhile, One Park Square in Doralkeeps filling up. And it’s not just retail and office. Demand is clearly rising for next-generation class A office space in Doral. Last August, Miller Construction started building the mixed-use Gateway Center Doral project there.

“Prior to the construction of Downtown Doral, the site was a decades-old suburban office park with vast fields of surface parking located directly across from the Trump National Doral Golf Resort and Spa,” Ana Codina-Barlick, CEO of the new Downtown Doral development. “We envisioned transforming this space into a vibrant urban core that would be the heart of this booming community with the amenities of a major metropolis in the comfort of a suburban neighborhood.”

Hines also hired High Street to market another commercial parcel, a 0.4 acre parcel in front of their 8800 Doral, a luxury 550-unit class A multifamily development next to Doral Corporate Center, the 278,000-square-foot class A office complex.

There’s Not Enough Of These Assets To Go Around

Hines hired High Street Retail to find a tenant for the corner of 87th and Doral Boulevard. High Street’s Sharon Dresser bought CVS to the table.

There’s Not Enough Of These Assets To Go Around

ORLANDO—Teal Henderson, a director at Calkain Companies, likes what she sees in the net lease market. Indeed, when it comes to capital flow, she tells GlobeSt.com the net lease asset market is still extremely active with Florida being at the top of the market lists.

Henderson is a speaker at the upcoming RealShare Central Florida event Sept. 7 in Orlando. She will take a seat on the State of Central Florida’s Capital Markets Panel.

“There is still a considerable delta between the inventory of quality net leased assets and the investors ready, able and seeking to buy,” Henderson says. “Assets with credit tenants are picked up immediately. Buyer brokers must act quickly to an asset being introduced to the open market or miss the opportunity to even submit an offer on it.”

From her perspective, more investors—both private and some public—are expanding their target parameters to include larger franchisee tenants, areas just outside major markets, and new concepts that were previously left off of their “will buy and actively seeking” lists. Cap rates, she shares, have held mostly flat for the last 10 months and for some tenants—read: Wawa, Chick-Fil-A, Applebee’s, CVS—and cap rates are continuing to compress a slow but consistent clip.

“Each set of sales are seeing the cap rates drop a few basis points,” Henderson says. “Cap rates for these top tenants are an average of 30 to 50 basis points less than they were in 2015. We have seen a marked increase in crossover and first time triple net buyers.”

“In the last six months there are first time net lease buyers coming from the agricultural and farming sectors as well as multifamily,” Henderson says. “Buyers who disposed of long held family farms are seeking more passive stable income and purchasing assets in the Southeast. Multifamily owners are diversifying their portfolio by adding some more stabilized income from net leased assets and mixed use urban retail developments. The traditional multifamily asset owners are adjusting ownership make up as housing markets are now focused on the Millennial generation combining the housing and retail lifestyles developments.”

What’s more, Henderson says, there is a consistent stream of international investor attention for the true net leased assets in Florida. She points to numerous South American investors seeking assets in Florida for US land ownership and stable income.

“Brazil, Argentina, Venezuela and Colombia have grown in number of inquiries and purchases of net leased assets located in Florida markets where they vacation or own second homes,” Henderson says. “China continues to increase the number of educated and able buyers of US commercial real estate. Even in countries with unfavorable exchange rates or during economic instability, there is a commitment to purchasing US assets. In one specific recent listing I had in Tampa, the Brazilian investor was able to purchase a new construction triple net asset in Tampa for all cash during the instability of the country’s currency. It was purchased all cash but was immediately refinanced.”

Steady gains in the US economy have resulted in net positives for the multifamily sector—will this wave continue for the foreseeable future? What’s driving development and capital flows? Join us at RealShare Apartments on October 19 & 20 for impactful information from the leaders in the National multifamily space. Learn more.

GlobeSt.com article